Roots dating

For instance, missing rings are rare in oak and elm trees.Critical to the science, trees from the same region tend to develop the same patterns of ring widths for a given period of chronological study.

In addition, particular tree-species may present "missing rings", and this influences the selection of trees for study of long time-spans.Moreover, wood from ancient structures with known chronologies can be matched to the tree-ring data (a technique called cross-dating), and the age of the wood can thereby be determined precisely.Dendrochronologists originally carried out cross-dating by visual inspection; more recently, they have harnessed computers to do the task, applying statistical techniques to assess the matching.European chronologies derived from wooden structures initially found it difficult to bridge the gap in the 14th century when there was a building hiatus, which coincided with the Black Death, Given a sample of wood, the variation of the tree-ring growths provides not only a match by year, it can also match location because the climate across a continent is not consistent.This makes it possible to determine the source of ships as well as smaller artifacts made from wood but which were transported long distances, such as panels for paintings and ship timbers.Removal of the bark of the tree in a particular area may cause deformation of the rings as the plant overgrows the scar.

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