How to stop a dating scam

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The scam has been used with fax and traditional mail, and is now prevalent in online communications like emails.While Nigeria is most often the nation referred to in these scams, they originate in other nations as well.Scams are designed to trick you into disclosing information that will lead to defrauding you or stealing your identity.Examples of email scams include: Phishing emails Phishing is a scam where criminals typically send emails to thousands of people.In 2006, 61% of internet criminals were traced to locations in the United States, while 16% were traced to the United Kingdom, and 6% to Nigeria.In that con, businessmen were contacted by an individual allegedly trying to smuggle someone that is connected to a wealthy family out of a prison in Spain.If a victim makes the payment, the fraudster either invents a series of further fees for the victim or simply disappears.According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), "An advance fee scheme occurs when the victim pays money to someone in anticipation of receiving something of greater value—such as a loan, contract, investment, or gift—and then receives little or nothing in return." There are many variations of this type of scam, including the 419 scam (also known as the Nigerian Prince scam), the Spanish Prisoner scam, the black money scam, Fifo's Fraud and the Detroit-Buffalo scam.

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If you’ve experienced cybercrime, you can contact the charity Victim Support for free and confidential support and information.He said he wanted to transfer million to the recipient’s bank account – money that was budgeted, but was never spent.In exchange for transferring the funds out of Nigeria, the recipient would keep 30% of the total.To get the process started, the scammer asked for a few sheets of the company’s letterhead, bank account numbers, and other personal information.Yet other variants have involved mention of a Nigerian prince or other member of a royal family seeking to transfer large sums of money out of the country—thus, these scams are sometimes called "Nigerian Prince emails".Another variant of the scam, dating back to circa 1830, appears very similar to what is passed via email today: "Sir, you will doubtlessly be astonished to be receiving a letter from a person unknown to you, who is about to ask a favour from you...", and goes on to talk of a casket containing 16,000 francs in gold and the diamonds of a late marchioness. It then asked what to do with profits from a .6 million investment, and ended with a telephone number.

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